Economical Wedding Flowers by Season

July 24, 2019

Fresh flowers are a beautiful way to decorate for any celebration. However, purchasing fresh flowers can be expensive. The best way to find the most economical flowers for every month of a year is to buy flowers when they are in season and widely available.

 

January through March

 

January through March is a good time to buy carnations, chrysanthemums, snapdragons, alstroemeria, daffodils and tulips. Avoid roses this time of year because of the Valentine's Day holiday, which causes the price of roses to skyrocket. Tulips are also priced higher in February, but their prices drop dramatically in March.

 

Our favorites during this time of year are...

Anemone (they are sometimes available as early as late November and into late April). 

Greek mythology has two legends about the anemone. These jewel-toned flowers were said to have sprung up from the blood that was shed by Aphrodite's lover, Adonis, when he died. The ancient Greeks also believed that Zephyrus, the god of the west wind, favored the bloom, hence its other name: windflower. Though unscented, this relative of the peony and ranunculus is sought after for its vibrant magenta, red and purple hues. Just a few bright blooms breathe color into bouquets and arrangements. Planning a black and white wedding? You'll have white blooms a plenty, but there are very few black varieties. Look to white anemones with black centers for some contrast in your florals.

 

Colors: white, pink, purple, magenta, burgundy

Scent: none

Meaning: expectation

Cost: $$

Camellia 

A symbol of loveliness and beauty, this multipetaled relative of the tea plant was originally from China. The flower had a notable role in Verdi's opera La Traviata, which he adapted from the play The Lady of the Camellias. In the story a courtesan named Violetta always wore a white camellia, except for the few days of the month when she was "not available" and donned a red camellia instead. Think of camellia's as a cross between ranunculus and peonies. In other words, it's great swap for out-of-season stems.

 

Colors: white, cream, pink, red

Scent: mild, sweet

Meaning: excellence, beauty, perfected loveliness, contentment

Cost: $$

Daffodil (Also Known as Narcissus, Paperwhite and Jonquil) 

Shakespeare and Wordsworth both created rhapsodies about this humble bulb flower. Perhaps it is so well liked since its merry yellow bloom is one of the first to appear after winter's frost subsides. The daffodil, and members of its family, including the narcissus and the jonquil, is a flower of true variety—blooms can be single or multiple, with large or small cups, in solid colors or in combinations of white and yellow with touches of orange. We love the look of bright, sunny orange and yellow arrangements. Add daffodils into the mix with ranunculus for a summer-ready bridal bouquet.

 

Colors: white, yellow, apricot, orange

Scent: clean, sweet or none, paperwhite narcissus has a very strong scent

Meaning: regard, respect, chivalry, gracefulness
Cost: $$

 

April through June

 

April and May are busy months for flower growers because so many flowers are in season. The two-week period before Mother's Day in May sees price increases for spring flowers, especially for miniature roses, orchids, snapdragons and lilies. However, bargains are still available for cornflower, chrysanthemums, carnations, alstroemeria and tulips. After Mother's Day, you can get good deals on snapdragons and lilies. In June, avoid the white flowers most often used in weddings, such as white roses, calla lilies, orchids and baby's breath.

 

Our favorites during this time of year are...

Cosmos

Brides hoping to capture the look of a summer garden in full bloom would succeed with cosmos. This daisylike flower grows in shades of pink and magenta on long stems with feathery foliage. A striking chocolate color is also available and can be used to create rich, late-summer arrangements. For a little twist on traditional daisies, look to cosmos to offer a modern-looking aesthetic.

 

Colors: white, pale pink, dark pink, chocolate

Scent: none

Meaning: modesty

Cost: $$

Daisies 

You may find the daisy a fitting flower for your wedding if you plucked its white petals in a game of "he loves me, he loves me not" as a child. Generally available year-around, the affordable daisy is a lovely and whimsical flower for a casual wedding. Is there anything more cheerful than a vaseful of daisies? We think not.

 

Colors: white

Scent: none to faint

Meaning: innocence, simplicity, I share your sentiments

Cost: $

Peony

The peony is showy in its lush and full-headed structure, sweet perfume and bright colors. Despite these traits, the flower became a symbol of bashfulness. Cultivated in Asia for more than a thousand years and developed further by the French, the peony is a cherished wedding flower. A relative of the ranunculus and the anemone, the peony is available in two main types: the herbaceous and the tree peony (the latter flowers do not last as long when cut). Looking for a big-headed bloom to adorn your cake, without overwhelming the beautiful design? Peonies take up just the right amount of real estate.

 

Colors: white, cream, peach, pink, burgundy

Scent: sweet and mild to very aromatic

Meaning: beauty, welcome, bashfulness

Cost: $$

Queen Anne's Lace

Known for the flower head's similar appearance to lace, this wildflower symbolizes "protection." Organic, untamed florals are ruling the rustic world. Let Queen Anne's lace be your filler in an arrangement of thistles, veronica flower and wax flowers, tied up with a sleek velvet ribbon.

 

Colors: white, green

Scent: grassy scent

Meaning: haven, protection

Cost: $ 

Tweedia 

Best used as an accent flower, these cheery, star-shaped blossoms grow on climbing branches. While available in white and pink, tweedia is most admired in its unusual soft blue hue. A delicate tweedia boutonniere provides a little "something blue" for the groom's lapel. This bright blue flower is perfect for a nautical or beachside wedding—dress them up with a few sea fairing details to complete the theme.
 

Colors: blue

Scent: none

Cost: $ 

 

Scabiosa

It's not hard to figure out how the scabiosa, with its tufted head atop a long, wiry stem, got its other name, pin cushion. This enchanting flower is right at home tucked in between showier blooms. After the bloom flowers, the scabiosa pod is equally as beautiful. It's often used in rustic, wild-looking bouquets for a touch of organic whimsy. Take your flower crown to the next level with a non-floral accent—scabiosa pods add an unexpected element to these boho hair accessories.

 

Colors: white, burgundy, lavender

Scent: none

Meaning: sensible woman

Cost: $$

 

 

Sweet Pea

The sweet pea was first brought to England from Sicily in 1699, and the English have had a love affair with this delicate flower ever since. Its sweet scent and rugged blossoms grown on a spindly green vine make this flower an old-fashioned favorite. Since these flowers pack such a fragrant punch, arranging them with other non-scented blooms will ensure you're not overwhelmed with aroma when walking down the aisle.
 

Colors: white, cream, apricot, pale pink, dark pink, red, lavender, purple

Scent: intense, sweet fragrance

Meaning: everlasting pleasures

Cost: $$

 

July through September

 

July through September is the slower period for the floral business. Colorful summer flowers such as gladiolas and Gerber daisies are less expensive this time of year. Chrysanthemums, snapdragons, carnations and alstroemeria are cheaper than in any other time during the year. July through August is the best time to buy any type of rose because of decreased demand. This is the time of year to buy orchids of all colors. Avoid flowers that grow from bulbs, such as lilies or tulips, this time of year. If they are available, they are expensive.

 

Our favorites during this time of year are...

Cornflower 

In medieval lore, it was believed that a girl who placed a cornflower beneath her skirt could have any bachelor she desired, which is perhaps how the flower acquired its other name, bachelor's button. An inexpensive choice appropriate for a casual wedding, the cornflower comes in white, pink, dark magenta and, most commonly, blue, with feathery blue-gray foliage. Its button head and colorful legend make it a charming boutonniere flower for groomsmen. Offset bigger headed blooms like peonies and garden roses with small additions of cornflowers in centerpieces and bouquets.

 

Colors: white, pink, blue

Scent: none

Meaning: delicacy, felicity

Cost: $$

Dahlia

These bold, bushy flowers have a history as dramatic as their appearance. Conquistadors found the dahlia in the gardens of the Aztecs and caused a sensation when they brought the flower back to Europe. As the dahlia gained popularity, the pursuit of its potatolike tubers was conducted with intrigue and deception—dahlia tubers were reportedly stolen even from the garden of the Empress Josephine. Look no further for the perfect fall bloom. Arrange with globe thistle, scabiosa pods and Queen Anne's lace for a whimsical, un-done bouquet.

 

Colors: white, yellow, orange, pink, red, purple

Scent: spicy

Meaning: gratitude, dignity, forever thine

Cost: $

Delphinium (Also Known as Larkspur) 

A classic in English cottage flower beds, the delphinium has towering spires and clustered florets. The delphinium and its sister, the larkspur, lend a country-garden feel to wedding arrangements while adding height and drama. Delphiniums can be found year-round, but most colors are at their peak from summer to early fall. If you're a fan of monochromatic color pairings, look no further than the vivid blue delphinium—it's the perfect addition to powder blue hydrangeas, tweedier or thistle. 

 

Colors: white, pink, lavender, purple, blue

Scent: none

Meaning: well-being, sweetness

Cost: $$

Phlox

Perhaps phlox's popularity at weddings is due to its meaning: "unification of the souls." These dainty flowers originated in North America, where they are a backyard staple. With large clusters of small-petaled, disk-shaped blossoms atop branching stems, phlox provides a lush backdrop for featured flowers in a bouquet or arrangement. These little flowers are perfect for a boho hairstyle with just a few blooms woved into a braid.

 

Colors: white, orange, pink, red, purple

Scent: sweet and mild to very aromatic

Meaning: our souls are united, proposal of love, sweet dreams, unanimity

Cost: $

Sunflower

The head of the sunflower follows the sun as it moves across the sky, a trait that undoubtedly inspired its symbolism: "adoration" and "loyalty." Bold and flashy, with raylike petals and disk-shaped dark centers, the sunflower is most at home at informal weddings. It comes in warm colors, from golden yellow to deep reddish brown. Since yellow is a prime color, play up other colors in the rainbow (like blue, purple and green) for a scenic and harmonious variety of florals.
 

Colors: pale lemon, deep gold, orange, russet, brown

Scent: none

Meaning: loyalty, adoration, pride

Cost: $

Tuberose

A native of Mexico, the tuberose has a very strong, heady scent, so small quantities of this flower go a long way. Its white, trumpet-shaped florets grow in clusters and open gradually along a light green stalk; the closed buds have a pink or green tinge. Most commonly used as a secondary flower, the tuberose lends bouquets a soft color and an intoxicating fragrance. This dainty white bloom is beautifully romantic when arranged with pastel pink roses, blush dahlias and white anemones.

 

Colors: ivory, pink

Scent: very strong perfume

Meaning: dangerous love, voluptuousness

Cost: $$

Zinnia

Brides seeking a spectrum of unforgettable color and a causal garden style will appreciate this perky, daisylike flower. The zinnia symbolizes "thoughts of friends," which makes it an appropriate element in bridesmaid bouquets or reception centerpieces. Simple and sweet, these flowers blend right into a vintage-themed wedding. Style them next to a stack of old school suitcases, books or antique frames. 
 

Colors: yellow, green, orange, pink, red

Scent: none

Meaning: thoughts of friends

Cost: $

 

October through December

 

October through December is a busy time for florists, but more flowers are becoming out of season, which drives up the cost. This is the one time of year when chrysanthemums, especially those with fall colors, are more expensive. However, carnations, alstroemeria and roses are still inexpensive this time of year. Any flower with fall colors of orange, red or yellow will cost more than a flower with spring colors of pale yellow, pink or blue. Greenery such as leather-leaf fern is often available at a good price because colorful seasonal foliage is in demand.

 

After Thanksgiving, flowers that are red or white begin to increase in price, including red roses, red chrysanthemums, white asters, lilies, snapdragons and baby's breath. Purchase flowers such as carnations, alstroemeria, daisies and lilies that are not red or white from Thanksgiving through Christmas for the best flower bargains.

 

Our favorites during this time of year are...

Amaryllis

Brides desiring maximum impact may choose this impressive flower, which features two to five large, trumpet-shaped blossoms that open in succession at the top of its extra-long stalk. Grown from a bulb, the amaryllis originated in the tropical rainforests of Africa and South America and is now available in white, pale yellow, pale green, pink, salmon and red. Very rare and expensive, these flowers are long-lasting and offer a lot of drama with just a few stems. The light pink hue is a true coral color, making it the perfect addition to a pretty summer wedding bouquet.

 

Colors: white, yellow, green, pink, red, burgundy

Scent: none (belladonna variety has a mild sweet fragrance)

Meaning: splendid beauty, pride

Cost: $$

Coxcomb 

Named the coxcomb due to its resemblance to a rooster, this vibrant flower is sure to make a statement. Coming in a variety of colors, it looks brilliant when cut short and used as a centerpiece. Paired with dahlias and garden roses, these three flowers with their unique architectural components create eye-catching centerpieces.

 

Colors: yellow, green, orange, pink, crimson

Scent: none

Cost: $

Tulips

Widely available, this flower shouldn't be overlooked just because it's fairly common; its versatility and wide range of colors make it a wonderful flower at weddings. Dutch tulips have shorter stems and smaller blossoms than the French tulip. Tulips are classic, but that doesn't mean your arrangements have to be—mix in some statement details like pheasant feathers for an edgier look.

 

Colors: white, yellow, orange, pale pink, dark pink, red, purple

Scent: none to mild, sweet scent

Meaning: declaration of love, honest, happy years, memory
Cost: $$

Muscari
Muscari or grape hyacinth gets its name from the shape of its flower and perhaps from its mild, sweet scent. Its cone-shape resembles a miniature bunch of grapes perched upside down on a slender green stem. Muscari is available in greenish white but is most often seen in a pretty purplish blue. This springtime bulb flower can be expensive, so it is best used as an accent or massed in small bunches.The size and shape (and smell!) of these stems are great for a personalized boutonniere—add a fern or silver dollar eucalyptus for a little greenery. 

 

Colors: white-green, blue-purple

Scent: sweet, like grapes or candy

Meaning: usefulness

Cost: $$

Hyacinth

In ancient mythology Hyacinthus was a figure in a tale of tragic love. Today, we know this stocky bulb flower as a fragrant signature of spring. The hyacinth's scent is strong, so only a few flowers are needed to make their presence known in centerpieces or arrangements. Clusters of this colorful flower add an interesting architecture and shape to traditional bouquets.

 

Colors: white, yellow, peach, pale pink, fuchsia, lavender, purple, blue

Scent: very sweet, stronger as florets open

Meaning: benevolence, play

Cost: $

Ranunculus

Looking for a cost-effective alternative to the rose and the peony? Try the lush, multi-petaled ranunculus, a relative of the buttercup. This flower was first seen by Westerners in the Far East around the thirteenth century. Available in practically every color, the ranunculus features several blossoms and a stem with fernlike foliage. These petit, petal-filled blooms are the perfect size and shape to supplement a headband of florals.

 

Colors: white, yellow, apricot, orange, pale pink, dark pink

Scent: mild, sweet

Meaning: you are rich in attractions, I am dazzled by your charms

Cost: $$

 

 

 

 

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